A summary of Chapters 10–12 in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid’s Tale

This definition is found to be true in the book, The Handmaid's Tale (1986) by Margaret Atwood....

How 'The Handmaid's Tale' Villains Were Inspired By …

In her Note to the Reader, she writes, " The thing to remember is that there is nothing new about the society depicted in The Handmaiden's Tale except the time and place.

But in Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood, it seems as though there is no in between.

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ offers a terrifying warning, but …

The Handmaids are considered powerful figures in the novels’ society while living in a dystopia of cultural feminism, which cause them to be degraded women with a loss of identity....

It is acceptable to say that in Atwood’s novel, The Handmaid’s Tale, none of these are permitted.

Atwood individualises the character of Serena Joy, as her high status in the society demands power and the domination over the inferior members of the Commander’s household, such as Offred – a handmaid....

This world gone mad is reminiscent of another Atwood novel written in 1986, The Handmaid’s Tale....


Isolation & Struggle in 'The Handmaid's Tale' ..

If the world Atwood depicts is chilling, if 'God is losing,' the only hope for optimism is a vision that includes the inevitability of human struggle against the prevailing order." -Joyce Johnson- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale analyzes human nature by presenting an internal conflict in Offred: acceptance of current social trends (victim mentality) -vs- resistance for the sake of individual welfare and liberties (humanity)....

One way “The Handmaid’s Tale” is bleeding over into real life

The small-screen adaptation of Margaret Atwood's 1985 dystopian novel "The Handmaids Tale" made it's late last month. Even at over 30 years old, the tale of a whole class of women becoming literal incubators for men in an oppressive theocratic society is proving as relevant and necessary as ever, particularly in light of recent moves made by the Republican-held White House and House of Representatives against and their male-centric revision of the list of that would allow health-insurance companies to reject applicants.

for men in an oppressive theocratic society is proving ..

His style of eloquence in his declamations was altogether feeble, lifeless, and uninspired, and it is very evident that he had not had the advantage of a teacher; indeed he was ignorant of most of the ordinary rules of declamation, things that even a schoolboy knows. But in his and other familiar addresses he succeeds in rousing himself and rises to the level of the ancient models. His writings are full of charm and facetious wit, while a refined elegance pervades the whole and is at the service of his eloquence. Moreover the peculiar charm and sweetness that all Syro-Phoenicians display in general intercourse one may safely look for in him, over and above his erudition. I mean that quality which the people of Attica call a keen scent, or urbane wit. This he cultivated as the very flower and crown of true culture; indeed he drew wholly on ancient comedy for his style of expression, and was master of all that shows a pleasing surface and enchants the ear. In his orations you will find the most profound erudition and the widest possible reading. You will meet also with unusual Attic forms and phrases. For example he would not have omitted those "trees " of Eupolis, Laispodias, and Damasias, if he had known the names by which men call the trees nowadays. Whenever he discovered some strange expression which because of its great antiquity had fallen into disuse, he cleansed it as though it were a sacred relic of the past, and when he had brushed off the dust and adorned it afresh he would bring it forth to the light, draped with a whole new theme and appropriate sentiments, like the dainty slaves and handmaids of a mistress who has just come into a fortune and has smoothed and polished away the signs of old age. For these reasons the sainted Julian also admired him, and indeed every man alive admired the charm of his oratory. Very many of his works are in circulation, and any intelligent man who reads them one by one will appreciate that charm. He had also a talent for administering public affairs, and in addition to his formal orations he would confidently undertake and easily compose certain other works more suited to please an audience in the theatre. When the later emperors offered him the very highest of all honours ----for they bade him use the honorary title of pretorian prefect----he refused, saving that the title of sophist was more distinguished. And this is indeed not a little to his credit, that though he was a man who longed most ardently for renown, he enslaved himself only to that renown which an orator can win, and held that any other sort is vulgar and sordid. He, too, when he died, had attained to a very great age, and he left in the minds of all men the profoundest admiration for his talents. The present author was not personally acquainted with him, inasmuch as an unkind fate on every occasion put one obstacle or another in the way.

The Handmaid's Tale creates a society that ..

The successors of Chrysanthius in the profession of philosophy are Epigonus of Lacedaemon and Beronicianus of Sardis, men well worthy of the title of philosopher. But Beronicianus has sacrificed more generously to the Graces and has a peculiar talent for associating with his fellows. Long may he live to do so!