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Designed for those who already have a background and connection to Korean culture, this course will focus on improving reading and writing proficiency in Korean as well as expanding knowledge of Korea’s traditional and modern popular culture. Most students have lived in an environment where Korean was spoken frequently at home.

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1903 -- First public screening of a film in Korea (the exact year is debated).
1910 -- Korea is formally annexed by Japan, after several years of effective colonization.
1919 -- First Korean film, a kinodrama (play with motion picture inserts) named ().
1923 -- First silent film, () directed by Yun Baek-nam.
1926 -- by Na Un-kyu.
1935 -- First sound film, directed by Lee Myung-woo.
1937 -- Japan invades China; censorship of film industry increases.
1945 -- Japan surrenders; Korea regains independence, but is soon divided in two.
1949 -- Korea's first color film, by Hong Seong-gi.
1950 -- War starts on the Korean Peninsula.
1953 -- Cease-fire agreement signed at Panmunjeom.
1956 -- Box office smash inaugurates industry revival.
1960 -- , directed by Kim Ki-young.
1961 -- , (pictured right) directed by Yu Hyun-mok.
1961 -- Military coup leads to consolidation and heavy regulation of film industry.
1973 -- Establishment of Korean Motion Picture Promotion Corporation (KMPPC).
1974 -- Establishment of Korean Film Archive.
1979 -- President Park Chung Hee is assassinated.
1980 -- Gwangju Uprising.
1981 -- , directed by Im Kwon-taek.
1988 -- Hollywood studios open first branch offices in Korea, led by UIP.
1992 -- is first film financed by a member of the chaebol (Samsung).
1993 -- Democratization spreads in Korea under new president Kim Young Sam.
1993 -- , directed by Im Kwon-taek, sets new local box office record.
1997 -- Opening of Namyangju Cinema Complex outside of Seoul.
1999 -- , directed by Kang Jae-gyu, kicks off commercial boom.
2001 -- Local market share tops 50%, boom in overseas sales.
2004 -- and become the first films to sell 10 million tickets.
2004 -- wins Grand Prix (second prize) at the Cannes Film Festival.
2006 -- breaks box office record and helps local market share reach 64%.


Published Volumes:

(2007) by Kim Young-jin (, )

(2007) by Huh Moonyung (, )

(2007) by Jung Han-seok (, )

(2007) by Kim Young-jin (, )

(2007) by Chung Sung-ill (, )

(2007) by Kim Hong-joon (, )

(2008) by Yi Hyo-in (, )

(2008) by Oh Dong-jin (, )

(2008) by Jang Byeong-won (, )

(2008) by Huh Moonyung, Jung Ji-youn (, )

(2008) by Kim Young-jin, Jung Ji-youn, Choi Eun-young (, )

(2008) by Lee Yoo-ran (, )

(2008) by Kim Kyoung-wook (, )

(2008) by Tony Rayns (, )

(2008) by Kim Hyung-seok (, )

(2008) by Kim Young-jin (, )

(2008) by Jang Byung-won, Choi Eun-young (, )

(2009) by Lee Sang-yong, Kwon Eunsun (, )

(2009) by Jung Ji-youn (, )

(2009) by Mun Gwan-gyu (, )

(2009) by Yu Yang-geun (,)

(2009) by Kim See-moo (, )


Comrade Kim Goes Flying, 2013

- Crisis of representation in realism in South Korean cinema
- New Korean realism: The cinema of Hong Sang-soo
- Social realism and North Korean cinema
- Fallen heroes of by Yu Hyun-mok
- New heroes of Korean and Japanese cinemas
- Developments of "imaginaire" in Korean and Japanese films
- Images of young people in Korean cinema

Comrade Kim Goes Flying, 2013

Last September, Nicholas Bonner, a British-born travel entrepreneur, film-maker and art collector, landed at Sunan International airport, not far from the capital Pyongyang, in . Sunan International airport isn’t like any other modern international airport. There are no car-rental desks, cafés, or frequent flier lounges. What you find instead are security officers who confiscate your mobile. (Not that it would work. North Korea has more mobile phones than you might assume – close to one million subscribers out of a population of 24.5 million – but mobiles are closed to outside networks; and the internet is restricted to the elite.)

One hundred whip-smart wisecracks

The abnormality of life in the People’s Democratic Party of North Korea (DPRK) is also apparent by the guides waiting outside the airport. DPRK is not a place where visitors can do anything and everything they please. “Foreigners” are only permitted into certain areas and are required to be accompanied by a guide.