Louis Armstrong Discography at Discogs

Check the status of your flight to or from Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.

The Louis Armstrong House Museum - Jazz History …

Armstrong joined with Columbia Records in the mid-'50s, and soon cut some of the finest albums of his career for producer George Avakian, including Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy and Satch Plays Fats. It was also for Columbia that Armstrong scored one of the biggest hits of his career: His jazz transformation of Kurt Weill's "Mack the Knife."

Louis Armstrong - Singer, Trumpet Player - Biography

Armstrong continued recording for Decca in the late 1940s and early '50s, creating a string of popular hits, including "Blueberry Hill," "That Lucky Old Sun," "La Vie En Rose," "A Kiss to Build a Dream On" and "I Get Ideas."

Shortly thereafter, Armstrong bragged about the child to his manager, Joe Glaser, in a letter that would later be published in the book Louis Armstrong In His Own Words (1999). Thereafter until his death in 1971, however, Armstrong never publicly addressed whether he was in fact Sharon's father.


List of songs with Songfacts entries for Louis Armstrong

Armstrong's charismatic stage presence impressed not only the jazz world but all of popular music. He recorded several songs throughout his career, including he is known for songs like "Star Dust," "La Vie En Rose" and "What a Wonderful World." Armstrong died at his home in Queens, New York, on July 6, 1971.

Louis Armstrong - Louis Armstrong Home Museum

Louis Armstrong, nicknamed "Satchmo," "Pops" and, later, "Ambassador Satch," was born in 1901 in New Orleans, Louisiana. An all-star virtuoso, he came to prominence in the 1920s, influencing countless musicians with both his daring trumpet style and unique vocals.

Louis Armstrong (1901–1971) | Kids Music Corner

Jazz music, probably the only art form ever wholly originated in America, and Louis Armstrong grew up together in New Orleans. It was in a seamy slum there that Mr. Armstrong learned to love and play jazz in the company of gamblers, pimps and prostitutes.

Louis Armstrong - Mosaic Records


The Complete Louis Armstrong Decca Sessions 1935-46 (#243)
Limited Edition: 10000 copies
7 CDs - $119.00


Biography: Louis Armstrong - Ducksters

In 1967, Armstrong recorded a new ballad, "What a Wonderful World." Different from most of his recordings of the era, the song features no trumpet and places Armstrong's gravelly voice in the middle of a bed of strings and angelic voices.

Louis Armstrong, Jazz Trumpeter and Singer, Dies

Mr. Ellington commented: "If anybody was Mr. Jazz it was Louis Armstrong. He was the epitome of jazz and always will be. He is what I call an American standard, an American original."