most notably the myriad ways social actors respond to conflict ..

All The Myriad Ways written by Doppler Effect Add To Bookshelf; Add To Groups; ..
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"Ballistic Balletics" catalogs the myriad ..

Yule, Andrew, Picture Shows--, Limelight Editions, 1992.

John W. Cones is a securities and entertainment attorney based in Los Angeles, where he maintains a private solo practice advising independent feature film, video, television and theatrical producer clients. A frequent lecturer on film finance and distribution, his lectures on "Investor Financing of Entertainment Projects" have been presented in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Dallas, Houston, Boise, Sacramento, Portland, San Francisco, Nashville, Charleston and Washington, D.C. and have been sponsored by the American Film Institute, IFP/West, state film commissions, independent producer organizations and American University. He has also lectured for the USC Cinema-TV School, the UCLA (graduate level) Producer's Program, UCLA Extension and the UCLA Anderson Graduate School of Management.His previous publications include, (a collection of 100 sample film industry agreements, available in hard-copy form or on computer diskettes) , , t, and numerous magazine and journal articles on related topics.
Definitions of some 3,600 terms used in the film industry in the finance and distribution of feature films. In addition, to the definitions, examples of usage and commentary are provided for some terms.A collection of 100 sample film industry agreements relating to acquisition, development, packaging, employment, lender financing, investor financing, production, distribution, exhibition, merchandising and licensing. A comprehensive overview of film finance with a discussion of advantages and disadvantages of forty-three different ways to finance feature films and other entertainment projects. A provision by provision critical analysis of the single most important film industry agreement. The book also provides samples of five different film distribution agreements in its appendix.--An anlayis of the various populations in the diverse U.S. society that have been consistently portrayed in Hollywood films in a negative or stereotypical manner. --A re-examination of the question raised earlier by Neal Gabler, Michael Medved, Joel Kotkin and others with respect to who really controls the Hollywood-based U.S. film industry and is therefore primarily responsible for the decisions made with respect to which movies are produced and released, who gets to work on those movies and the actual content of such films.

Those reasons generally have to do with the myriad of ways in ..

Yule, Andrew, Picture Shows--, Limelight Editions, 1992.

John W. Cones is a securities and entertainment attorney based in Los Angeles, where he maintains a private solo practice advising independent feature film, video, television and theatrical producer clients. A frequent lecturer on film finance and distribution, his lectures on "Investor Financing of Entertainment Projects" have been presented in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Dallas, Houston, Boise, Sacramento, Portland, San Francisco, Nashville, Charleston and Washington, D.C. and have been sponsored by the American Film Institute, IFP/West, state film commissions, independent producer organizations and American University. He has also lectured for the USC Cinema-TV School, the UCLA (graduate level) Producer's Program, UCLA Extension and the UCLA Anderson Graduate School of Management.His previous publications include, (a collection of 100 sample film industry agreements, available in hard-copy form or on computer diskettes) , , t, and numerous magazine and journal articles on related topics.
Definitions of some 3,600 terms used in the film industry in the finance and distribution of feature films. In addition, to the definitions, examples of usage and commentary are provided for some terms.A collection of 100 sample film industry agreements relating to acquisition, development, packaging, employment, lender financing, investor financing, production, distribution, exhibition, merchandising and licensing. A comprehensive overview of film finance with a discussion of advantages and disadvantages of forty-three different ways to finance feature films and other entertainment projects. A provision by provision critical analysis of the single most important film industry agreement. The book also provides samples of five different film distribution agreements in its appendix.--An anlayis of the various populations in the diverse U.S. society that have been consistently portrayed in Hollywood films in a negative or stereotypical manner. --A re-examination of the question raised earlier by Neal Gabler, Michael Medved, Joel Kotkin and others with respect to who really controls the Hollywood-based U.S. film industry and is therefore primarily responsible for the decisions made with respect to which movies are produced and released, who gets to work on those movies and the actual content of such films.--A comprehensive analysis and discussion of hundreds of the specific business practices used during the nearly 100-year span of control of the Hollywood-based U.S. film industry by the so-called Hollywood control group (or traditional Hollywood management).

In 1990, "Spike Lee's was " . . . about a jazzman . . . (and about) . . . being so wrapped up in your career that you don't have space for relationships, and you can't see where you're headed . . . " Also, "[o]ne sideman (in the band) has a white girlfriend, and the others argue the pros and cons of that until he tells them it's none of their business." According to Roger Ebert the purpose of the 1990 film, , was" . . . to isolate, exaggerate, and dramatize the ways in which women are the handmaidens of society in general and men in particular . . . " Ebert suggests that the " . . . movie seems equally angry that women have to have children at all, and that it is hard for them to have children now that men have mucked up the planet with their greedy schemes."


Definitions of terrorism - Wikipedia

Contributions to Charity--Another legitimate and possible secondary motivation for making money is to be able to provide large contributions to selected charitable causes. As Gabler points out, however, "[f]or the Hollywood Jews, for whom status was far more critical than assuaging guilt, charity was a way of buying respectability." "Jack Warner demanded that his Jewish employees donate a percentage of their salary to the United Jewish Welfare Fund. During a fund-raising drive, he would call them into the studio commissary (and say) 'You won't ever work here again if you don't give to the United Jewish Appeal.'" In a more contemporary environment, Peter Bart reports, that " . . . barely a month went by (during Frank Yablans' tenure as president of Paramount) without Frank Yablans being anointed "humanitarian of the year" or "man of the hour" by one group or another, and Paramount could always be counted on to make a hefty contribution to the charity in question."

There is no universal agreement on the definition of terrorism

In discussing the power of talent agents in the contemporary marketplace, director Sydney Pollack explains that as a " . . . result of their new power . . . agencies today share with studios much of the decision-making process as to what movies get made. That process was once exclusively studio-driven." Pollack then asks the question: "Has this resulted in better films? I don't think so. Do these pictures make more money? Without question, yes. Is that the primary reason for the existence of Hollywood? Unequivocally, yes." Thus, Pollack returns to the argument that making money is " . . . the primary reason for the existence of Hollywood . . . " Again, unfortunately, that does not answer the question of what Hollywood does with its money. In other words, there is a difference between a group of people who desire money just so they can buy more things, as opposed to people who also want to use that money to help gain power and to do something significant with that money. Thus, just to offer that money is what Hollywood is all about, does not satisfy the need to know what really makes Hollywood tick (i.e., money is and always has been a means to some other end).