Odysseus’ Metis during the Trojan War | The Trojan War

He is named after the alias used by Puss In Boots, a Trickster character in his own right.
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List of fictional tricksters - Wikipedia

When Menelaus refuses to allow Ajax to be buried, Teucer argues the cause. He points out that his brother came as a king and brought his own men to Troy. Menelaus may be the King of Sparta, but he had no right to direct the affairs of the dead man. Of course, this is a flawed argument because the Atreidae did direct everything for ten years and it was also attempts on their lives that caused Ajax to kill himself. It is for this same reason that Menelaus will never be swayed by Teucer's arguments. Menelaus may have known the archer, but he was never in any direct command of him. The person to persuade him is someone he knows well, trusts, and respects. That is why it is Odysseus' arguments that win over the Atreidae. The skilled speech maker is now using his abilities to win burial for a man who deserves to be buried. R.P. Winnington-Ingram says that Odysseus "certainly [belongs] to a world which reasons and argues," but why does Odysseus fight this battle? Why does he risk the friendship of Agamemnon and Menelaus?

Jack Shaftoe is the Trickster in spades as is, to a lesser extent, Eliza
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The Charisma of Odysseus | Word Nerds

Odysseus is again commissioned to hold the army together. Agamemnon wants to move some of the ships and believes the gods are against a victory for them. He ends his speech with, "the man does better who runs from disaster than he who is caught by it."These words could have been spoken by Odysseus himself, but instead, he is brave enough and angry enough to stand up to Agamemnon for speaking them. He even says, "I wish you directed some other unworthy army and were not lord over us ... " He is confident enough to tell Agamemnon that his plan will not work and should be forgotten. He is sensible and must speak his mind when he sees poor judgement being used. He also tells Achilles that the men need to rest and eat before they can do their best in battle, and to send them out would be foolhardy. Odysseus again fails to convince Achilles and he does not eat. Later, Athena must give Achilles nectar and ambrosia for strength, proving that Odysseus was right again.

As a result, few major players don't have shades of the grifter and Trickster to them: ...
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is a play that shows the devastating effects of war and what happens to captives in the aftermath. The tragedy opens with the speech of Hecuba's son Polydorus, who was in the care of his father's Thracian friend during the Trojan War, but who was recently murdered for gold. The queen lives with the assumption that her last remaining son is alive and looks forward to seeing him soon. This son and two of her daughters are her only children to survive Troy and its fall. A chorus of captive women bring her terrifying news that her daughter Polyxena is to be sacrificed on Achilles' tomb, and that it was Odysseus who had convinced the Greeks to perform the ceremony:

The only times he was really trickster-ish were mainly when he wanted to annoy his brother, Quetzalcoatl.
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Magnificent Bastard - TV Tropes

The pain and horror is evident as Hecuba tells her daughter of her fate. When Odysseus enters, he is calm and callous, telling the fallen queen not to get upset for 'it is prudent, even in bad times, to use common sense." This sounds characteristically Odysseus. Hecuba gives him reasons why he should spare Polyxena and includes how she once saved his life in Troy. Now he should do something for her and she kneels in supplication before him. Odysseus ignores her pleading and tells her that Achilles requested the sacrifice and it could not be disregarded. Hecuba tells her daughter to supplicate herself to Odysseus, but he prevents her from doing so. Polyxena accepts her fate, but kills herself. Her mother is treated with sympathy by no other than the cold-hearted Agamemnon. Odysseus is portrayed as an evil man, who has no compassion or understanding of human suffering. This is a contrast with the sympathetic man we see in .

HERMES MYTHS 3 HERALD - Greek Mythology - THEOI

In the , Odysseus is portrayed as a combination of quintessential trickster and smooth talking sophist, who has no compassion for Philoctetes whatsoever and no qualms about corrupting Achilles' son. At the end of the play, his deceitful tactics do not work. He loses whatever hold he had over Neoptolemus and does not get agreement from Philoctetes that he or his bow will go to Troy. Neoptolemus gave the bow back to its rightful owner and agreed to take him home. Its original owner then appears to give directions. Heracles tells his old friend Philoctetes that he must go to Troy with Achilles' son and fulfill the will of Zeus. Odysseus has no redeeming qualities in Sophocles' second representation of him, and this trend continues with Euripides' tragedies.

Daxon Levine – Author and Creator of Worlds

Hecuba is right to hate this man for soon she learns of his plan to throw her sweet grandson off the walls of her city, to die a tragic death. Andromache says, "But this is horrible beyond all measure!" and it is to the reader, as well. When Astyanax is brought in on his father's shield, dead, Odysseus is really seen as an evil man, even if he is doing such things for the good of Greece because he shows no mercy for the Trojans.