Where is Saint Vincent And The Grenadines

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The Geography of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines



Saint Vincent and The Grenadines is an island nation that is part of the Lesser Antilles chain, located in the southeastern Caribbean Sea. The population of Saint Vincent and The Grenadines is 109,643 based on 2016 estimates. The country's capital city and largest city is Kingstown, with a population estimated at 16,500 in 2010.

Saint Vincent and The Grenadines Coordinates: 13°10′N 61°14′W (Kingstown)

Total land area: 150 sq.

The national anthem of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is "", adopted upon independence in 1979.

Maps of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines - Flags, …

The island of Saint Vincent is volcanic and includes little level ground. The windward side of the island is very rocky and steep, while the leeward side has more sandy beaches and bays.[] Saint Vincent's highest peak is at 1,234 m (4,049 ft).

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The local population changed during the 16th century as a result of the influx of formerly enslaved Africans. A shipwreck off Barbados contained enslaved Africans, and many of them escaped and made their way to Saint Vincent. Also, escaped slaves from Saint Lucia and Grenada sought refuge on Saint Vincent. This African population intermarried with the local population, and the result was the Black Caribs or Garifuna. This local population fiercely resisted European settlement until 1719.

Medical Aviation – no helicopter rescue servicePolice (Royal Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Police Force) – no aviation unit


Geography of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines - …

From 1763 until its independence in 1979, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines passed through various stages of colonial status under the British. A representative assembly was authorised in 1776, Crown Colony government was installed in 1877, a was created in 1925, and was granted in 1951.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines - Fact Monster

Slavery was in Saint Vincent (as well as in the other British colonies) in 1834, and an apprenticeship period followed which ended in 1838. After its end, labour shortages on the plantations resulted, and this was initially addressed by the immigration of indentured servants. In the late 1840s many Portuguese immigrants arrived from and between 1861 and 1888 shiploads of East Indian labourers arrived. Conditions remained harsh for both former slaves and immigrant agricultural workers, as depressed world sugar prices kept the economy stagnant until the start of the 20th century.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is a …

St. Vincent was ceded to by the , after which friction between the British and the Caribs led to the . The island was and regained by the British under the . Between 1795 and 1796, with French support from , the , led by their chief, , fought a series of battles against the British. Their uprising was eventually put down, resulting in almost 5,000 Black Caribs being exiled to the tiny island of off the coast of .

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines – Aeroflight

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines lies to the west of south of and north of in the of the , an of the . The islands of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines include the main island of 344 km2 (133 sq mi) and the northern two-thirds of the 45 km2 (17 sq mi), which are a chain of small islands stretching south from Saint Vincent to Grenada. The capital of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is Kingstown, Saint Vincent.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Geography - Flags, …

The first Europeans to occupy St. Vincent were the French. Following a series of wars and peace treaties, the islands were eventually ceded to the British. While the English were the first to lay claim to St. Vincent in 1627, the French centred on the island of . French settlers were the first European settlers on the island when they established their first colony at on the Leeward side of St. Vincent in 1719. The French settlers cultivated coffee, tobacco, indigo, corn, and sugar on plantations worked by African slaves.