Free The Negro Speaks of Rivers papers, essays, and research papers.

 Throughout the poem 'The Negro Speaks of Rivers' Hughes uses the word 'I' (4).

The Negro Speaks of Rivers [Langston Hughes, E

“Mother to Son” and “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” are poems written by Langston Hughes that use symbolism to exemplify the struggles of African Americans as they attempt to persevere through adversity.

Hughes is saying that the culture of these people has ?grown deep like the rivers?

Langston Hughes, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” | …

Throughout the poem 'The Negro Speaks of Rivers' Hughes uses metaphorical statements to suggest to the reader what the soul of the African American has been through....

People have equated rivers to the aspects of life - time, love, death, and every other indescribable quality which evokes human life.

Negroes in this life are denied the Priesthood; under no circumstances can they hold this delegation of authority from the Almighty. (Abra. 1:20-27.) The gospel message of salvation is not carried affirmatively to them... negroes are not equal with other races where the receipt of certain spiritual blessings are concerned, particularly the priesthood and the temple blessings that flow there from, but this inequality is not of man's origin. It is the Lord's doing, is based on his eternal laws of justice, and grows out of the lack of Spiritual valiance of those concerned in their first estate.


The Negro Speaks of Rivers BY LANGSTON HUGHES | …

Walters: On this revelation, of the priesthood to the Negro, I've heard all kinds of stories: I've heard that Christ appeared to the apostles; I've heard that Joseph Smith appeared; and then I heard another story that Spencer Kimball had had a concern about this for some time, and simply shared it with the apostles, and they decided that this was the right time to move in that direction. Are any of those stories true, or are they all?

Craig McLeish: The Negro Speaks Of Rivers (Novello …

Not only was Cain called upon to suffer, but because of his wickedness he became the father of an inferior race. A curse placed upon him and that curse has been continued through his lineage and must do so while time endures. Millions of souls have come into this world cursed with a black skin and have been denied the privilege of Priesthood and the fullness of the blessings of the Gospel. These are the descendants of Cain. Moreover, they have been made to feel their inferiority and have been separated from the rest of mankind from the beginning.... we will also hope that blessings may eventually be given to our negro brethren, for they are our brethren-children of God-not withstanding their black covering emblematical of eternal darkness.

The Negro Speaks of Rivers Quotes by Langston Hughes

"We had this special prayer circle, then I knew that the time had come. I had a great deal to fight, of course, myself largely, because I had grown up with this thought that Negroes should not have the priesthood and I was prepared to go all the rest of my life till my death and fight for it and defend it as it was. But this revelation and assurance came to me so clearly that there was no question about it." (Deseret News, Church Section, January 6, 1979, page 4)

The negro speaks of rivers howard swanson – Imazi

You speak of our activity in Birmingham as extreme. At first I was rather disappointedthatfellow clergymen would see my nonviolent efforts as those of an extremist. I beganthinking about thefact that I stand in the middle of two opposing forces in the Negro community. One is aforce ofcomplacency, made up in part of Negroes who, as a result of long years of oppression, areso drainedof self respect and a sense of "somebodiness" that they have adjusted to segregation; andin part of afew middle-class Negroes who, because of a degree of academic and economic security andbecausein some ways they profit by segregation, have become insensitive to the problems of themasses. Theother force is one of bitterness and hatred, and it comes perilously close to advocating violence. It isexpressed in the various black nationalist groups that are springing up across the nation,the largestand best known being Elijah Muhammad's Muslim movement. Nourished by the Negro'sfrustrationover the continued existence of racial discrimination, this movement is made up of peoplewho havelost faith in America, who have absolutely repudiated Christianity, and who have concludedthat thewhite man is an incorrigible "devil."