Roddy Doyle, Bookclub - BBC Radio 4

26/08/2017 · Roddy Doyle’s new novel, ..
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Roddy Doyle | Irish Writing Blog

His other novels for adults include (1996) and (2006) - a pair of books about a woman recovering from an abusive marriage; and a historical trilogy - (1999), (2004), and (2010) - about Henry Smart, an IRA assassin who fights in the 1916 rebellion, emigrates to America, and ends up writing for Hollywood. Among other works, Doyle has also published , including (2007) and (2003); and a nonfiction memoir about his parents, (2002).

Doyle has dipped his pen in nearly every category of children's fiction. (2000) is the first installment of a middle-grade trilogy about the Mack family and their dog Rover. The other books in the trilogy are (2001) and (2004). For young adult readers, (2007) is part family drama and part husky sled adventure. In 2008, Doyle made a foray into picture-book territory with (illustrated by Freya Blackwood) - a story about a girl who, like Emer in , loses her mother when she is only three.

In a 2011 interview with , Doyle speaks about his working method, which allows him to have several irons in the fire at once. He describes working on at the same time he was putting together , a collection of stories about "the vaguely comic despair of middle-aged manhood":

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Roddy Doyle and the mindset of the writer | Irish …

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Reviewed by Ashley
"Polishing the Working-Class?: A Sociolinguistic Reading of Roddy Doyle's "Barrytown Trilogy" and Later Fiction​"
by Ake Persson


Reviewed by Kathryn

Aug 10, 2013 · Roddy Doyle and the mindset of the writer
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Roddy Doyle wrote the book for the stage adaptation of “The Commitments,” now running in London’s West End. Doyle said he knows of no current plans to bring the show to the United States.

Roddy Doyle on IMDb: Movies, Tv, Celebrities, and more..
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What The Critics Are Saying About Roddy Doyle - SFGate

In 1987 an unknown Irish writer named Roddy Doyle self-published his first novel, “The Commitments,” the story of a motley group of out-of-work young Dubliners who are melded into a soul band by a young impresario named Jimmy Rabbitte.

Literary Birthday - 8 May - Roddy Doyle - Writers Write

Born in 1958 in Dublin, Roddy Doyle is a prolific Irish writer who has found over two decades-worth of material in the humorous, tender, and fraught life of the family. Americans may be most familiar with Doyle's wise-cracking dialog and its lilting Dublin intonations from the popular film adaptations of his : (1987), see trailer below; (1990); and (1991). The three stories center around one middle-class Dublin family and their enterprises - a soul band, a teen pregnancy, a fish-and-chips van.

In 1993, Doyle won the Man Booker Prize for , a story told from the point of view of a ten-year-old boy living in the Barrytown section of north Dublin. For its language and perspective, the novel often draws comparisons with James Joyce's - connections, Doyle says, he hates. He explains in : If you're a writer in Dublin and you write a snatch of dialogue, everyone thinks you lifted it from Joyce. The whole idea that he owns language as it is spoken in Dublin is a nonsense. He didn't invent the Dublin accent. It's as if you're encroaching on his area or it's a given that he's on your shoulder. It gets on my nerves.His other novels for adults include (1996) and (2006) - a pair of books about a woman recovering from an abusive marriage; and a historical trilogy - (1999), (2004), and (2010) - about Henry Smart, an IRA assassin who fights in the 1916 rebellion, emigrates to America, and ends up writing for Hollywood. Among other works, Doyle has also published , including (2007) and (2003); and a nonfiction memoir about his parents, (2002).

Doyle has dipped his pen in nearly every category of children's fiction. (2000) is the first installment of a middle-grade trilogy about the Mack family and their dog Rover. The other books in the trilogy are (2001) and (2004). For young adult readers, (2007) is part family drama and part husky sled adventure. In 2008, Doyle made a foray into picture-book territory with (illustrated by Freya Blackwood) - a story about a girl who, like Emer in , loses her mother when she is only three.

In a 2011 interview with , Doyle speaks about his working method, which allows him to have several irons in the fire at once. He describes working on at the same time he was putting together , a collection of stories about "the vaguely comic despair of middle-aged manhood": If you are dealing with a family story like and put that away for a day and then focus on the life of a middle aged man and think, well those characters share the same kitchen somehow and then it's fun to look at something from different perspectives. I work roughly from nine to six and there is no commute so if you sit and do nothing it seems like an eternity. So, actually, you have plenty of time to write. I might do three pages of Greyhound and then read a football website or hang out the washing and put on a coffee and by the time I come back I have had time to shed one and get ready for the other. Sometimes one leaks into the other, but I am reasonably good at identifying that.To learn more about Roddy Doyle's writing process, read this 2010 article in in which he shares his top ten pieces of advice for budding writers, including: